How to Make Your Own Squash and Cordial

How to Make Your Own Squash and Cordial

Squash, cordial, fruit syrup… whatever you prefer to call it, I certainly know that I occasionally prefer to drink something with a little more flavour than water and drinking squash often helps me to drink more than I otherwise would. If you’re trying to cut down on (or completely cut out) plastic, squash can be a pain. Unless you want to spend more money on glass-bottled cordials, squash almost always comes in plastic bottles with plastic caps. Not the most sustainable of materials to say the least! This easy squash recipe however should help you tackle that problem.

All you need is fruit, sugar and water, and for the equipment you only need a saucepan, a spoon, a bowl and a nut milk bag (also known as a cheese cloth). The bags/cloths are really cheap, so if you don’t have one, have a look on Amazon. If you’re wanting to make squash out of fruit that isn’t a berry (like oranges for example), you’ll also need either a juicer or a blender.

In this post I’ve shared 3 of my favourite squash recipes; raspberry, blackcurrant and orange. After you’ve read through the ingredients and methods you’ll get the gist of how to easily make squash, and will most likely understand how you can add in your own favourite ingredients and make other flavours that are more suited to your likes. Have fun with it!

Raspberries

Raspberry Squash Ingredients (for approx. 750ml)

1kg fresh or frozen raspberries

100ml water

350g granulated sugar

Raspberry Squash Method

1. Heat the raspberries and water together in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally, and bring to the boil.

2. Lower the heat to simmer and continue to stir/mash up the raspberries and water until they are fully softened and broken up. This step should take 10-20 minutes. Leave aside to cool.

3. Over a bowl, pour the raspberry mixture into a nut milk bag (/cheese cloth) and squeeze as much of the liquid through it into the bowl as you can. If it’s still dripping there’s still liquid in there! Discard of the leftover cooked raspberries (this should mostly be the tiny pips) and rinse out the saucepan you used earlier if you haven’t already washed it up.

4. Transfer the strained liquid back into the rinsed out saucepan and add the sugar to it. Simmer over a low heat, stirring until the sugar has fully dissolved. Have a taste test but be very careful not to burn your tongue! Take some of the liquid out on a small spoon and blow it to cool it down before trying it. If you think it needs more sugar, add some more to the saucepan (about 40g at a time). Keep stirring and simmering until the liquid has slightly thickened (it won’t thicken very much).

5. Once you’re satisfied, remove the saucepan from the heat and leave to cool slightly for 5 minutes, before transferring to a glass bottle and leaving at least a 2cm gap at the top (don’t fill it to the brim unless you want the bottle to explode). Seal the top with the lid. Once cooled, store in your fridge for up for four months and serve at a ratio of 1:5 squash to water (or prosecco or lemonade or sparkling water… you name it). Enjoy!

Blackcurrant Squash

Blackcurrant Squash Ingredients (for approx. 750ml)

1kg fresh or frozen blackcurrants

600ml water

450g granulated sugar

Blackcurrant Squash Method

1. Heat the blackcurrants and water together in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally, and bring to the boil.

2. Lower the heat to simmer and continue to stir/mash up the blackcurrants and water until they are fully softened and broken up. This step should take 10-20 minutes. Leave aside to cool.

3. Over a bowl, pour the blackcurrant mixture into a nut milk bag (/cheese cloth) and squeeze as much of the liquid through it into the bowl as you can. If it’s still dripping there’s still liquid in there! Discard of the leftover cooked blackcurrants (this should mostly be any solid bits) and rinse out the saucepan you used earlier if you haven’t already washed it up.

4. Transfer the strained liquid back into the rinsed out saucepan and add the sugar to it. Simmer over a low heat, stirring until the sugar has fully dissolved. Have a taste test but be very careful not to burn your tongue! Take some of the liquid out on a small spoon and blow it to cool it down before trying it. If you think it needs more sugar, add some more to the saucepan (about 50g at a time). Keep stirring and simmering until the liquid has slightly thickened (it won’t thicken very much).

5. Once you’re satisfied, remove the saucepan from the heat and leave to cool slightly for 5 minutes, before transferring to a glass bottle and leaving at least a 2cm gap at the top (don’t fill it to the brim unless you want the bottle to explode). Seal the top with the lid. Once cooled, store in your fridge for up for four months and serve at a ratio of 1:5 squash to water (or prosecco or lemonade or sparkling water… you name it). Enjoy!

Oranges

Orange Squash Ingredients (for approx. 750ml)

1.5kg fresh oranges

100ml water

350g granulated sugar

Orange Squash Method

1. Peel and chop up the oranges.

2. Blitz the peeled oranges with the water in a blender.

3. Strain the blended oranges through a nut milk bag (/cheese cloth) into a clean bowl. Get as much of the liquid out as you can and then discard of the leftovers (there should just be pips and maybe some stringy bits of orange left too in the bag).

4. Transfer the strained liquid into a saucepan and add the sugar to it. Simmer over a low heat, stirring until the sugar has fully dissolved. Have a taste test but be very careful not to burn your tongue! Take some of the liquid out on a small spoon and blow it to cool it down before trying it. If you think it needs more sugar, add some more to the saucepan (about 40g at a time). Keep stirring and simmering until the liquid has slightly thickened (it won’t thicken very much).

5. Once you’re satisfied, remove the saucepan from the heat and leave to cool slightly for 5 minutes, before transferring to a glass bottle and leaving at least a 2cm gap at the top (don’t fill it to the brim unless you want the bottle to explode). Seal the top with the lid. Once cooled, store in your fridge for up for four months and serve at a ratio of 1:5 squash to water (or prosecco or lemonade or sparkling water… you name it). Enjoy!

How to Make Your Own Fruit Juice (Without a Juicer)

How to Make Your Own Fruit Juice (Without a Juicer)

0